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Luxor, once an Ancient Egyptian capital, is a city in Upper (southern) Egypt and the capital of Luxor Governorate. As the site of the Ancient Egyptian city of Thebes, Luxor has frequently been characterized as the "world's greatest open air museum", From the tomb of Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings and the magnificent sunset views at the majestic temple complexes of Karnak and Luxor to the exciting and fun Nile cruises, Luxor is the perfect choice for culture vultures. Thousands of tourists from all around the world arrive annually to visit these monuments, contributing a large part towards the economy for the modern city.
Luxor is divided by the Nile into two areas commonly called the East Bank and West Bank which were considered in Ancient Egyptian times as symbolizing respectively Life and Death. 
While the East Bank has grown to become a modern city, it has retained its lush green setting, its traditional bazaar and stunning view of the Nile. The East Bank boasts some of Egypt's most refined hotels, home to amazing Spa's and a golf course.
The West Bank is known for its necropolis and mortuary temples: the Valley of the Kings, the Valley of the Queens, the Workers Village, and the Temple of Medinet Habu are the highlights of Luxor’s West Bank. In Ancient Egyptian mythology the setting sun to the west symbolised the journey to the afterlife, so it was fitting symbolism to bury the dead west of the Nile.
Luxor (Thebes) was once the capital of Egypt during the New Kingdom (and the glorious city of the god Amon-Ra) and seat of power for almost 1350 years, precisely from 2100 BC to 750 BC. Architectural works remarkably flourished during this period, under various Theban Kings. The Theban Necropolis, on the West bank of the Nile is a living proof, as it is perhaps the world’s richest archaeological site. Impressed by the immortal monuments, and huge palaces, Arabs gave the city its current name “Luxor”, meaning “the city of palaces” referring to the remaining temples.

What to see?
Valley of the Kings:

Directed by a strong belief in the afterlife, Theban Pharaohs dug their tombs deep into the Theban hills along with their priceless possessions, to keep away robbers. Sadly, burial chambers were raided, yet the magnificent structures remain with symbolic representations, and paintings of the underworld. A truly impressive site! There, you will find Tutankhamen’s tomb which was discovered almost intact in 1922 and the tomb of Ramses IV, among others. A ticket will allow you visiting 3 of the 63 tombs on site, except Tutankhamen’s tomb, which requires an additional ticket. Although the tomb alone is worth a visit, you will have to visit the Egyptian Museum in Cairo to see the treasures Tutankhamen was buried with.
Hatshepsut Temple:
Located beneath massive cliffs near the west bank of the Nile, the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as Deir el Bahri, is dedicated to Amon-Ra, the sun god. Designed by an architect named Senemut, the temple is unique because it was designed like classical architecture. Note the lengthy, colonnaded terrace some of which are 97 ft high, pylons, courts, and hypostyle hall. Inside you’ll see the sun court, chapel and sanctuary. Temple reliefs depict the tale of the divine birth of Hatshepsut and trade expeditions to the Land of Punt (a reference to modern Somalia or the Arabian Peninsula).
Karnak Temple Complex:
The Karnak Temple Complex is home to three main temples, several smaller enclosed temples, and a number of outer temples – combining the achievements of many generations of ancient builders over a period of 1500 years. Around thirty different pharaohs contributed to the building process of this site, enabling it to reach a size, complexity and diversity not seen elsewhere. It was after all the New Kingdom's most sacred site.
The Ancient complex covers a total area of 2 sq. km, and its name "Karnak" means "fortified settlement" in Arabic. The temple of Amun, the complex's main structure, is the largest place of worship ever built. It is surrounded by two other gigantic temples, dedicated to Amun's wife, Mut and his son, Khonsu, respectively. Although it might seem badly ruined today, there are still many features to Karnak that make it one of the largest and most impressive of all ancient sites in Egypt.

Luxor Temple:
Walking in an unforgettable, Grand Avenue of Sphinx leads you to the breathtaking façade of Luxor’s temple: your gateway to an elegant example of Pharaonic architecture. Dedicated to the worshipped Theban triad of Amun- the principle God of Thebes, his wife Mut, and son Khonsu- the temple was completed by the 18th dynasty pharaoh Amenhotep III, with a main intent of practicing the most important ancient ritual “Opet”. During the flood season, the King’s re-birth, as the son of Amun was celebrated, by carrying Theban triad’s images on magnificent barques to the Nile, then to Luxor temple. 
Other sites in the city to find:
* Luxor Museum 
* Mummification Museum
* Valley of the Queens
* Medinet Habu (memorial temple of Ramesses III)
* The Ramesseum (memorial temple of Ramesses II)
* Deir el-Medina (workers' village)
* Tombs of the Nobles
* Colossi of Memnon (memorial temple of Amenophis III)

 

Climate:
Sun and warmth all year round characterizes Luxor’s climate, the sun shines for 11 hours during summer and 8 during winter. Winter temperature averages around 26°C, in summer temperature reaches 39°C.

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